Climate sceptics?


Climate change is an often heard argument for the once called nuclear "renaissance". However, if one looks closer, there was something fishy about the industry using climate change protection as its most prominent feature... » Read more

More then thirty years of debate, and the controversy remains as polarised as ever. This website (to be fair - whose maintainer is anti-nuclear) collects news about nuclear power in Europe, sorted by nuclear power plant, type of power plant, country etc.

By presenting different (media) angles on current nuclear issues, we hope to be able to cut out some spin, either pro or against, and to allow the reader to make up his or her own mind about today's pro's and con's of nuclear power.

In the menu on the right you can select your country, the nuclear power plant in your neighbourhood, or your favourite company and read latest (most English) news about it.

Latest nuclear news

Incident with nuclear fuel bars in Slovenian Krsko

Friday, October 25, 2013

During a regular maintenance of the nuclear power plant “Krsko” in Slovenia damages have been found on bars for the nuclear fuel. It was determined that one of the bars fell down to the bottom of the reactor with water.

Nuclear plant is still functioning, but it is not known until when, although reasons for this incident are unknown.

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Uranium ban overturned

Friday, October 25, 2013

A narrow majority of the Greenlandic parliament passed a measure to overturn the country's ban on uranium mining.

By the slimmest of margins, Greenland’s parliament has passed a measure to overturn the country’s ban on uranium mining. Coalition partners Siumut and Atassut secured 15 votes in favour of the measure to end the ban, implemented in 1988. Fourteen voted against. Speaking in favour of overturning the ban, Greenland’s premier, Aleqa Hammond, said it was a matter of economic priorities.

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Finance deal agreed for Polish nuclear plant

Friday, October 25, 2013

Poland’s nuclear power ambitions have moved a step forward after four state companies agreed to team up to finance a 3,000-megawatt unit.

State utility PGE, which is coordinating the project, will sell three 10% stakes to utilities Tauron and Enea and to copper and silver producer KGHM. The total cost of the project is likely to be almost €10bn, according to government estimates.

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EU to examine aid for UK nuclear deal

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

AFP - The European Commission said Tuesday it would examine British government support for a massive 19-billion-euro nuclear plant to be built by French and Chinese firms.

London announced Monday plans for two reactors to be built by French energy giant EDF, backed by the world's leading nuclear power company, Areva of France, and Chinese nuclear firms CGN and CNNC.

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Britain to build Europe's first nuclear plant since Fukushima

Sunday, October 20, 2013

LONDON/PARIS (Reuters) - Britain is set to sign a deal with France's EDF for the first nuclear plant to start construction in Europe since Japan's Fukushima disaster raised safety concerns worldwide, at a cost estimated at around $23 billion.

Under the deal, expected to be announced on Monday, the French utility will lead a consortium, including a Chinese group, to construct two European Pressurised Water Reactors (EPRs) designed by France's Areva.

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Four Central European states urge EU to support nuclear energy

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

BUDAPEST, Oct 14 (Reuters) - Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary want the European Union to support nuclear energy projects and not to over-regulate the area, Prime Minister Viktor Orban said on Monday after a summit of the "Visegrad Four" countries.

The four also threw their backing behind shale gas extraction in Europe, and agreed to set up a natural gas market forum with the aim of fostering a regional gas market, which will convene in Budapest this month, Orban said.

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Full probe call after nuclear train derails in Barrow

Thursday, October 10, 2013

INVESTIGATIONS have been launched to determine how a train carrying nuclear flasks derailed between Roose and Barrow stations.

Emergency crews raced to the scene, just behind Salthouse Road, Barrow, at about 2.15pm yesterday and St Luke’s Avenue was cordoned off.

A spokesman from International Nuclear Services Ltd, a subsidiary of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, which is responsible for the management and transport of nuclear material, said the train had been on the way to Sellafield carrying empty flasks when it derailed while travelling at approximately 5mph.

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EU Commission says nuclear energy not in energy state aid guidelines

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

BRUSSELS, Oct 8 (Reuters) - Guidelines for when EU member states can use taxplayers' money to support energy generation will not include nuclear power, the European Commission, the EU executive, said on Tuesday.

Commission spokesman Antoine Colombani said EU Competition Commissioner Joaquin Almunia proposed that guidelines, expected to be published in November, should not include specific criteria on nuclear power. The other commissioners had agreed, he said.

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The birthing pains of new nuclear

Sunday, October 6, 2013

With a deal over subsidies now weeks away, Emily Gosden looks back at the tortuous path to this point and the challenges that remain.

Ed Davey was adamant. He had never given a “day-by-day or week-by-week account” of the negotiations with EDF, and nor was he about to start — no matter how much the assembled journalists wanted to know whether a deal to build Britain’s first reactor in a generation would finally be agreed in the few weeks before the energy firm’s end-of-year deadline.

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Commission split over state aid for nuclear

Thursday, October 3, 2013

The European Commission is divided over state-aid rules for energy and the environment ahead of a debate to be held in Strasbourg next week (Tuesday 8 October). The Commission is preparing guidance for member states in a bid to solve inconsistencies that have plagued two areas: feed-in tariffs for renewable energy, and state subsidies for nuclear power plants. A draft version of the guidance will be issued by the end of the year, with a view to adoption in 2014.

The nuclear industry wants European Union rules changed so that member states can provide direct state aid for building nuclear power plants. But member states and Commission departments are split on the issue. Several member states – including France, the Czech Republic and the UK – want the Commission to relax state-aid rules so they can use environmental subsidies to fund nuclear plants, seeing such a policy as part of a ‘low-carbon' approach. But other countries, including Germany and Austria, are adamantly opposed to nuclear being on the same footing as renewables when it comes to environmental subsidies.

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